Gendering Peace Conference Poster-page-001

Gendering Peace Conference

About the Conference

During and after the First World War, blueprints for peace and a non-violent reordering of society permeated all countries in Europe. They were political, artistic and practical responses to the experience of total war, based on a wide array of different political and religious values and motives. While many of these ideas and initiatives have been studied in some detail, the gendering of peace in Europe during and between the two world wars has not as yet been systematically analysed.

The gendering of initiatives for and debates over peace was a crucial element of European politics from the onset of the Great War to the struggles over appeasement in the run-up to the Second World War, and to the planning for post-war reconstruction. The gendering of peace is more than just the study of women’s pacifist groups – even though this is an important part of it. The notion of a gendering of peace refers to the fact that the different roles, emotions, and forms of agency that are attributed to men and women were crucial parameters for the ways in which a non-violent re-ordering of national polities and international relations was envisaged and legitimised. For example, male conscientious objectors as well as female pacifists were portrayed as ‘effeminate’, thus delineating a gendered space for the debate over non-violent politics. Discourses on nationalism and sovereignty in the wake of the Treaties of Paris in 1919/20 were ripe with gendered metaphors that portrayed the task of peaceful self- determination as a predominantly male endeavour. Debates over maternalism and the role of mothers in society were a crucial site for conceptualising a critique of belligerence.

The organising themes of the conference are as follows:

  1. gender and non-violent practices, including the reception of Gandhi’s ideas in Europe;
  2. masculine/feminine values and metaphors in debates over national sovereignty and rearmaments;
  3. competing spaces and forms of agency for men and women in European pacifism;
  4. the gendering and politicization of pacifism and peace campaigns across the political spectrum;
  5. the evolution of pacifist commitment in the face of fascism and war.

We will discuss these issues in this two-day conference, to be held at the HRI on 20-21 January, 2017.

Please see the conference website for the call for papers and further details

Erika Dyck: ‘Tripping through the Doors of Perception? Psychedelic lessons from the past’

Medical Humanities Sheffield (MHS) and the Intoxicants Project are very pleased to invite you to the following research seminar:

Tripping through the Doors of Perception? Psychedelic lessons from the past

Professor Erika Dyck, Canada Research Chair in the History of Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan

Abstract:
Psychedelics fell from medical grace nearly half a century ago, but recent activity suggests that some researchers have ‘high hopes’ for their return. Over sixty years ago Albert Hofmann at Sandoz Pharmaceutical Laboratories in Switzerland first synthesized LSD and personally experienced its effects in 1943. Over the next 15 years, over a thousand articles appeared in medical and scientific publications based on LSD research. By the mid-1960s, LSD research ground to halt as it had become synonymous with countercultural activities, hedonism, and drug abuse. Recently, that situation has started to change. A new generation of researchers has taken up the torch with an eye to resurrecting the psychedelic science of the 1950s, particularly along the paths of addiction research and palliative care. Will this new group of enthusiasts be more nimble, or have cultural circumstances changed sufficiently to embrace psychedelics anew?

Details:
Wednesday, 9 November 2016, 16:00-18:00
Council Room at Firth Court
University of Sheffield, Western Bank,
Sheffield, S10 2TN, United Kingdom
https://goo.gl/maps/mHbr9WWdsqJ2

Professor Dyck is the author of Psychedelic Psychiatry: LSD on the Canadian Prairies (2012, Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press) and Facing Eugenics: Reproduction, Sterilization, and the Politics of Choice (2013, Toronto: University of Toronto Press). For more on Professor Dyck please refer to http://research-groups.usask.ca/history-medicine/biography.php

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to email Ryo Yokoe at ryokoe1@sheffield.ac.uk

Digital-Panopticon

Job Opportunity: Public Engagement and Impact Officer for the Digital Panopticon project

The AHRC funded Digital Panopticon project are seeking to recruit a Public Engagement and Impact Officer. The post is part-time (55%) during the final nine months of the project, joining a team of investigators from the Universities of Sheffield, Liverpool, Oxford, Sussex and Tasmania.

The Digital Panopticon: The Global Impact of London Punishments, 1780-1925’ (www.digitalpanopticon.org) links together existing and new criminal justice, genealogical, and biometric datasets held by different organisations in the UK and Australia in order to trace the impact of punishment on convict lives. Based in the Humanities Research Institute, you will develop and implement plans to generate publicity for the project web resource and its research findings following the release of the completed website in spring 2017, and maximise the non-academic impact of the project.

The application deadline is the 15th November.
For more details and to apply click here