Tag Archives: 19th Century

PhD-Masters-Scholarships

PhD Studentship Available – ‘Crime and Policing in 18th and 19th-Century London’

This studentship is attached to the AHRC funded Digital Transformations project, ‘The Digital Panopticon: The Global Impact of London Punishments, 1780-1925’, a collaborative project between the Universities of Liverpool, Sheffield, Oxford, Sussex, and Tasmania.

The project seeks to use innovative digital methodologies to investigate the penal outcomes of those convicted at the Old Bailey, by comparing imprisonment in Britain with transportation from Britain to Australia. The project will assemble large and complex bodies of criminal justice, genealogical and biometric data and use sophisticated visualisation and data-linking methodologies to map and analyse convict lives at both the collective and individual level.

The award will cover the cost of UK/EU tuition fees and provides an annual maintenance grant at the standard RCUK rate (full-time rate £13,863 for 2014-15) for three years. The studentship will commence on 1 October 2015.

To apply for the studentship, applicants need to apply directly to the University of Sheffield for entrance into the doctoral programme in History.

The general eligibility requirements are:

• Students applying for a doctoral studentship should normally have, or be studying for, a Master’s degree, or equivalent qualification, in History or a related discipline.
• Applicants should also have a 2.1 in a BA degree, or equivalent qualification, in history or a related discipline.
• Awards are open to UK, EU and international applicants who are applying to study either full or part-time.

For more information please see:
http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/history/phd/crime-and-policing

Any academic enquiries should be directed to Professor Robert Shoemaker (r.shoemaker@sheffield.ac.uk).

Any questions about the application process should be directed to Beky Hasnip (r.hasnip@sheffield.ac.uk).

Seminar: ‘Creditable People’: Women’s Roles in Local Credit Networks, Glasgow c.1740-1830

The Gender History Discussion Group Speaker-led session:

‘Creditable People’: Women’s Roles in Local Credit Networks, Glasgow c.1740-1830

Wednesday 19th February 2014, 2pm – 3pm: Catriona MacLeod (University of Glasgow) 

Hicks Building, seminar room F30

All Welcome!

Research Seminar: How does democracy ‘spread’? Conceptualising the history of democracy in the Mediterranean region from the later eighteenth to the later nineteenth century

Research Seminar: How does democracy ‘spread’? Conceptualising the history of democracy in the Mediterranean region from the later eighteenth to the later nineteenth century

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Cancelled – Research Seminar: ‘Several Lives in One’: The Problem of Writing the Biography of Frederick Douglass

Apologies this event has been cancelled. It has been rearranged for the 13th of May. 

‘Several Lives in One’: The Problem of Writing the Biography of Frederick Douglass. 11th February 4.15pm: David Blight (Yale). Chair: Andrew Heath

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Sheffield Americana band team up with historian

An unlikely collaboration between a Sheffield-based Americana band and Dr Andrew Heath from the Department has produced an album with a difference, inspired by 19th century American history.

Photo of Andrew HeathThe Mule and the Elephant by The Payroll Union will be launched on 19 January 2013 at Club 60, recording studio to Sheffield bands Reverend and the Makers and The Crookes.

Lead singer Peter David, who currently works in Student Services at the University of Sheffield, explained how the collaboration with Dr Andrew Heath came about and the inspiration behind the album: “I met academics from the Department of History at one of our Tramlines gigs this year. They were interested to know how and why I came to write songs primarily about 19th Century American characters and events, and more specifically the Jacksonian Era (roughly 1815-1848). I didn’t study history, I’m just interested in this period – the most interesting in American history, I think – it’s full of duels, religious persecution, political corruption and sex scandals!”

“Our shared interest in this era led us to decide to work together on a joint project. I asked Andrew if he would like to write the liner notes for the album to expand on some of the themes and he agreed, which is really exciting. We’re also in the process of submitting a proposal for Arts Enterprise funding to work on a collaborative project about the antebellum period, drawing on a lot of Andrew’s research.”

Dr Heath said: “It’s been a pleasure to work with Pete, who is not only a great songwriter, but also a very talented historian. The album he’s written brings to life people and ideas I’ve been teaching and researching for the last ten years and it’s been exciting for me and my students to find someone who can tell the stories we explore through books and articles in such a novel way.”