Tag Archives: Early Modern

Updated April Deadline Crime and Mobility

Studentship: Crime, Innovation and Mobility: Transport Migration and Policing in England, 1750-1950

Applications are invited for the above ESRC Network project studentship commencing on 1 October 2016. This opportunity is part of the wider ESRC Network on ‘Comparative Historical Perspectives on Crime, Innovation and Social Change’ in collaboration with the University of York and the University of Leeds.

Application deadline: 5pm, Friday 29 April 2016
Interviews: interviews will take place week commencing 9 May 2016

For more information please click here

Felicity Green

CANCELLED – Dr Felicity Green (Edinburgh): Oeconomia before economics: Locating the household in early modern thought

Unfortunately it has been necessary to cancel this event. We hope to rearrange at a later date.

‘Oeconomia’ – the art of household management – was understood in the early modern period as one of the three parts of practical philosophy, alongside ethics and politics. What was the relationship between these three disciplines and spheres of human activity – between the identities and duties of human beings as individuals, members of households, and citizens? In what ways can closer attention to early modern ‘economics’ enrich our understanding of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century moral and political thought?
– Dr Felicity Green

Chair: Anthony Milton

Jessop West G.03
All welcome!

image: Quentin Matsys (1456/1466–1530) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Tim Stretton: ‘Married Women in Chancery 1500-1800: Law, Gender & Contract’

Speaker: Professor Tim Stretton

Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, Canada

Thursday 4th December, 5pm
(Jessop West Seminar Room 7)
– please note the change in room

Professor Tim Stretton specializes in the social history of law and litigation in Britain, with a focus on the legal rights and experiences of women and intersections between law and literature in early modern England.Tim’s first book, Women Waging Law in Elizabethan England (1998), remains one of the most important books in its field, showing how women utilized the law despite being (theoretically) subjugated by it. It examines both discourse and legal tactics and this combination of the literary and historical runs through Tim’s more recent work. Recent publications include (ed. with Krista Kesselring)Married Women and the Law: Coverture in England and the Common Law World (2013) and ‘Conditional promises and legal instruments in The Merchant of Venice’ in Donald Beecher et al, eds, Taking Exception to the Law: Materializing Injustice in Early Modern English Literature (2014).

Tim completed his PhD with Keith Wrightson at Cambridge, before teaching at Durham and Cambridge.  He is now based at Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, Canada.  We are lucky that Tim is over from Canada for a few short weeks. His papers are always engaging so this promises to be a lively seminar.

Gender History and Early Modern Discussion Group Session

Calling all History PhD students!

We wish to welcome you to a joint session run by the Gender History and Early Modern Discussion Groups. This session will involve 5-minute ‘lightning talks’ from PhD students from the History Department.

The event will take place on:
Tuesday 25th November 2014, 2:00pm
Jessop West Exhibition Space

This is an opportunity for all PhD students researching Gender History and/or the Early Modern period to focus on improving their presentation skills, informing an audience of their research, and also an opportunity for first year students to share/discuss ideas for their new projects.

Please email hip12lrb@sheffield.ac.uk if you are interested in presenting at this session by Friday 21st November

 

 

Early Modern Discussion Group: Student ‘Windows into Research’ session

Details TBC.

The Early Modern Discussion Group (EMDG) is a postgraduate led group for the circulation and discussion of ideas about early modern history. We have a variety of speakers each semester who generally give 20 minute papers, with two speakers in each session, though sometimes we have just one speaker who will present a longer paper. We sometimes also have reading sessions where we discuss a recent journal article.

Early Modern Discussion Group: ‘The merchant’s daughter, the merchant’s wife: faith, knowledge and translation in England’s early sixteenth centuy Atlantic trading networks’

John Gallagher, University of Cambridge (TBC). Early Modern Discussion Group seminar.

The Early Modern Discussion Group (EMDG) is a postgraduate led group for the circulation and discussion of ideas about early modern history. We have a variety of speakers each semester who generally give 20 minute papers, with two speakers in each session, though sometimes we have just one speaker who will present a longer paper. We sometimes also have reading sessions where we discuss a recent journal article.

Early Modern Discussion Group: ‘Religion’: Inaugural ‘Windows into Research’

Emma Rhatigan (English), Antony Milton (History), and Iona Hine (Biblical Studies)

The Early Modern Discussion Group (EMDG) is a postgraduate led group for the circulation and discussion of ideas about early modern history. We have a variety of speakers each semester who generally give 20 minute papers, with two speakers in each session, though sometimes we have just one speaker who will present a longer paper. We sometimes also have reading sessions where we discuss a recent journal article.

Early Modern Discussion Group: ‘Rituals of reconciliation in early modern Europe’

Prof. Stuart Carroll (University of York). Early Modern Discussion Group seminar. To be followed by a drinks reception for all new early modern postgraduate students.

The Early Modern Discussion Group (EMDG) is a postgraduate led group for the circulation and discussion of ideas about early modern history. We have a variety of speakers each semester who generally give 20 minute papers, with two speakers in each session, though sometimes we have just one speaker who will present a longer paper. We sometimes also have reading sessions where we discuss a recent journal article.