Tag Archives: Medical Humanities

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Julie Gottlieb granted a Seed Award in Humanities and Social Science from the Wellcome Trust

Julie’s Seed Award in Humanities and Social Science will begin in late 2017 supported by The Wellcome Trust, a global charitable foundation which supports researchers in their efforts to take on big problems, and to spark debates. Julie’s project is entitled ‘Suicide, Society and Crisis’ and will focus on links between suicide and socio-political crisis.

About the project:
For over 150 years, instances and rates of suicide have been a hugely symbolic resource for making statements about society. The key goal of this project is to investigate the links between suicide and political and social crisis, at macro and micro levels. Do suicide rates increase in times of socio-political crisis, and, if so, why? How do psychiatrists, pathologists, jurists, coroners, politicians, and the public understand suicide epidemics as symptomatic of instability? These questions will be brought to bear on a case study of the suicide epidemic triggered by war fear during the Munich Crisis (1938-39), and documented in the Wellcome collections, Coroners records and Press representation. Together with key collaborators in the medical humanities and the crossdisciplinary field of suicidology, in two conferences we will test psychological, psychiatric, sociological and historical theories about how internalisation of dramatic socio-political change effects incidents, methods, and attitudes towards suicide. Our preliminary findings will be disseminated through journal articles, History & Policy, and blogs, offering historical insight into recent suicide epidemics connected to PTSD and veterans of the Iraq Wars, the increase in suicides during the 2008 Financial Crisis, mental health in refugee communities, up to the psychological fallout of Brexit.

Erika Dyck: ‘Tripping through the Doors of Perception? Psychedelic lessons from the past’

Medical Humanities Sheffield (MHS) and the Intoxicants Project are very pleased to invite you to the following research seminar:

Tripping through the Doors of Perception? Psychedelic lessons from the past

Professor Erika Dyck, Canada Research Chair in the History of Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan

Abstract:
Psychedelics fell from medical grace nearly half a century ago, but recent activity suggests that some researchers have ‘high hopes’ for their return. Over sixty years ago Albert Hofmann at Sandoz Pharmaceutical Laboratories in Switzerland first synthesized LSD and personally experienced its effects in 1943. Over the next 15 years, over a thousand articles appeared in medical and scientific publications based on LSD research. By the mid-1960s, LSD research ground to halt as it had become synonymous with countercultural activities, hedonism, and drug abuse. Recently, that situation has started to change. A new generation of researchers has taken up the torch with an eye to resurrecting the psychedelic science of the 1950s, particularly along the paths of addiction research and palliative care. Will this new group of enthusiasts be more nimble, or have cultural circumstances changed sufficiently to embrace psychedelics anew?

Details:
Wednesday, 9 November 2016, 16:00-18:00
Council Room at Firth Court
University of Sheffield, Western Bank,
Sheffield, S10 2TN, United Kingdom
https://goo.gl/maps/mHbr9WWdsqJ2

Professor Dyck is the author of Psychedelic Psychiatry: LSD on the Canadian Prairies (2012, Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press) and Facing Eugenics: Reproduction, Sterilization, and the Politics of Choice (2013, Toronto: University of Toronto Press). For more on Professor Dyck please refer to http://research-groups.usask.ca/history-medicine/biography.php

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to email Ryo Yokoe at ryokoe1@sheffield.ac.uk