Tag Archives: Research Seminar

Patel

Prof Kiran Patel (Maastricht): The New Deal: A Global History

This presentation summarizes some of the findings of my forthcoming book with the same title (America in the world series; Princeton University Press, planned for fall 2015). How does the reaction of the United States compare to the way other societies reacted to the Great Depression and other challenges of the time? And which links did the New Deal make and unmake? In the talk, I will speak about the book’s conceptual basis as well as some of its empirical findings.

– Prof Kiran Patel

Chair: Eirini Karamouzi

Felicity Green

CANCELLED – Dr Felicity Green (Edinburgh): Oeconomia before economics: Locating the household in early modern thought

Unfortunately it has been necessary to cancel this event. We hope to rearrange at a later date.

‘Oeconomia’ – the art of household management – was understood in the early modern period as one of the three parts of practical philosophy, alongside ethics and politics. What was the relationship between these three disciplines and spheres of human activity – between the identities and duties of human beings as individuals, members of households, and citizens? In what ways can closer attention to early modern ‘economics’ enrich our understanding of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century moral and political thought?
– Dr Felicity Green

Chair: Anthony Milton

Jessop West G.03
All welcome!

image: Quentin Matsys (1456/1466–1530) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Prof Greg Hanlon (Dalousie): The behavioural sciences and military history

The paper will discuss the important shift in thinking about the wellsprings of human behaviour occurring since the 1980s, away from culture and towards the existence of human universals. The talk will discuss the theoretical approach to the study of war and collective violence, and then examine some important work in psychology, anthropology and human and primate ethology as they apply to this problem. It will conclude with a selection of recent work by historians who are alive to these issues as they comb the sources for evidence of conflicts in the past.

-Prof Greg Hanlon
Chair: Phil McCluskey

Jessop West G.03
All welcome!

HIV

Dr Shane Doyle (Leeds): HIV and history in Africa

The first AIDS cases in Africa were reported from Uganda in 1982. Since then close to 30 million people have died of AIDS-related causes across Africa. Rather than discuss the history of the epidemic over this period, a story which is well known, this paper will consider how recent trends in research into HIV require a re-evaluation of the emergence of the epidemic.
-Dr Shane Doyle (Leeds)

Chair: Esme Cleall

Jessop West Exhibition Space
All Welcome!

Erika Hanna

Dr Erika Hanna (Edinburgh): ‘There’s no banshee now’: Ghosts and loss in inner city Dublin, c. 1975–1985

During the 1970s and 1980s Dublin underwent an intense period of economic and physical upheaval; traditional industries were in rapid decline, emigration reached levels unseen for a generation, while the inner city was popularly perceived to be a no-go territory, ravaged by epidemics of crime and drugs. In this period folklore scholars from University College Dublin turned their attention towards the city, to record the perceived absences in the folkloric collections of the university. A team of researchers, hired as part of a government employment scheme, were equipped with cameras and audio devises and sent into Dublin’s inner city. Over two years they conducted over a thousand hours of interviews, questioning older residents on a series of distinct, yet entwined topics: ghost stories, folk beliefs, and popular customs.

This paper examines how Dublin’s declining landscape was conceived in the oral histories and photographs of the Urban Folklore Project. Cleared of tenements and industrial buildings, much of the landscape of the inner city stood derelict and vacant. I explore how these interstitial landscapes played an important role in the reproduction of folk believe in the city: in the stories of the city’s residents these shadowy spaces were transformed into places of enchantment, inhabited both by the apparitions of rural superstition and of the disappeared heroes who had once challenged British rule. However, they were also sites where people were mugged, where addicts congregated, and where derelict factories and warehouses revealed the failed promise of modernization. I argue that the city’s derelict spaces became a key part of structuring understanding the failings of independence in the late 1970s and 1980s. The city’s empty sites elided distinct arenas of desire for the historical past: for the structures of rural belonging, the ideals of revolution, the community of the tenements, and for a city where the docks still functioned.

 

– Dr Erika Hanna
Chair: Sarah Miller Davenport

Jessop West Exhibition Space
All Welcome!

Research Seminar: ‘Several Lives in One’: The Problem of Writing the Biography of Frederick Douglass

This seminar has been rearranged from the 11th of February.

‘Several Lives in One’: The Problem of Writing the Biography of Frederick Douglass.

13th May 4.15pm: David Blight (Yale). Chair: Andrew Heath

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Research Seminar: ‘Russia shall not corrupt me, nether one waye not other’: engaging with Russia in the Elizabethan Commonwealth

Research Seminar: ‘Russia shall not corrupt me, nether one waye not other’: engaging with Russia in the Elizabethan Commonwealth

6th May: Felicity Stout (Sheffield). Chair: Tom Leng

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Research Seminar: Apostolic encounters in the Mongol ruins: some reflections on the problem of ‘religion’ as a category in global history

Research Seminar: Apostolic encounters in the Mongol ruins: some reflections on the problem of ‘religion’ as a category in global history

29th April 4.15pm: Amanda Power (Sheffield). Chair: Phil McCluskey

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America Meredith, London Calling (2012)

Research Seminar: Indigenous London: Native Travellers at the Heart of Empire

Research Seminar: Indigenous London: Native Travellers at the Heart of Empire

1st April 4.15pm: Coll Thrush, University of British Columbia. Chair: Caroline Pennock

Urban and Indigenous histories have usually been treated as though they are mutually exclusive. Coll Thrush’s work, however, has argued that the two kinds of history are in fact mutually constitutive. In this presentation, Dr. Thrush will present material from his current book project, a history of London framed through the experiences of Indigenous people who travelled there, willingly or otherwise, from territories that became the US, Canada, New Zealand, and Australia. Stories of Inuit captives in the 1570s, Cherokee delegations in the 1760s, Hawaiian royals in the 1820s, and more – as well as the memory of these travellers in present-day communities – show the ways in which London is the ground of Indigenous history and settler colonialism.

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