Tag Archives: studentship

Updated April Deadline Crime and Mobility

Studentship: Crime, Innovation and Mobility: Transport Migration and Policing in England, 1750-1950

Applications are invited for the above ESRC Network project studentship commencing on 1 October 2016. This opportunity is part of the wider ESRC Network on ‘Comparative Historical Perspectives on Crime, Innovation and Social Change’ in collaboration with the University of York and the University of Leeds.

Application deadline: 5pm, Friday 29 April 2016
Interviews: interviews will take place week commencing 9 May 2016

For more information please click here

ESRC Network Project Studentship

Studentship: Crime, Innovation and Mobility: Transport Migration and Policing in England, 1750-1950

Applications are invited for the above ESRC Network project studentship commencing on 1 October 2016. This opportunity is part of the wider ESRC Network on ‘Comparative Historical Perspectives on Crime, Innovation and Social Change’ in collaboration with the University of York and the University of Leeds.

Application deadline: 12pm, Friday 18 March 2016
Interviews: interviews will take place on Thursday 24 March 2016

Supervisory team: Professor Bob Shoemaker (Department of History, Sheffield), Dr Mark Roodhouse (Department of History,York)

This project will focus on three key areas of investigation:

  1. the new criminal opportunities which opened up between 1750 and 1950 as a result of transport innovations and the increases in migration and mobility which they facilitated;
  2. the resulting innovations in policing in response to the changing activities and tactics of criminals; and
  3. the social, economic, political and legal consequences of this dialectic between crime and policing.

While these issues have previously been addressed superficially in popular histories, they have never received careful scholarly analysis. With the creation of new digital resources including newspapers and the convict lives database created by the AHRC funded Digital Panopticon project, it is possible for the first time to trace criminal activity and mobility systematically. To facilitate a comparative perspective, the research will adopt a case study approach, focusing on specific periods of innovation and change. This will provide a perspective on topics of contemporary relevance, particularly how criminality is shaped by technological and social change; how innovations in crime have forced changes in policing, and with what success (and vice versa); and the extent to which migration and mobility are associated with specific patterns of crime.

For information please see: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/history/phd/funding-crime

je suis charlie

New WRoCAH Network studentship: ‘Beyond Charlie: Anticlericalism and Freedom of the Press’

We are delighted to announce a new WRoCAH Network studentship working on ‘Beyond Charlie: Anticlericalism and Freedom of the Press’ for entry in October 2015. WRoCAH networks each have three doctoral researchers, one each at Leeds, Sheffield and York. Each doctoral researcher works on a separate project under a common theme.

The award will cover the cost of UK/EU tuition fees and provide an annual maintenance grant (£14,057 in 2015-16) for three years.

Application deadline: midnight, Friday 22 May 2015

Interviews: interviews will take place on Monday 15 June 2015

Further information about the award and how to apply is available on our website here.

The network theme

The Paris attacks on 7 January 2015 make this an apposite moment to assess the deep cultural and historical links between iconoclastic thought and freedom of the press in western Europe. The proposed network will reassess anticlerical print culture and ideas of free speech, taking as its starting point the Hébertiste tradition of radical and scabrous political satire, a tradition in which Charlie Hebdo clearly stands. Though part of a wider secularist tradition, this populist—and often deliberately provocative—strand of anticlerical transmission should be distinguished from literary forms or those rooted in social and political movements.

The Sheffield studentship focus

Supervisory team: Professor Mary Vincent (Department of History, Sheffield), Dr Claire Chambers (Department of English and Related Literature, York)

The studentship will examine the relationship between the polemic and ideological traditions of anticlericalism (clearly aimed at Catholicism in countries with a historic allegiance to the Roman Church) and contemporary polemic aimed at Islam (or perceived tendencies within Islam, such as ‘fundamentalism’). This comparative study would explore issues of tolerance within societies looking at how debates around anticlericalism and/or Islamophobia bring into play conflicting understandings of freedom, including in societies characterised by religious indifference.

Any academic enquiries can be directed to Professor Mary Vincent (m.t.vincent@sheffield.ac.uk). Any questions about the application process should be directed to Beky Hasnip (r.hasnip@sheffield.ac.uk).

fairground

We are delighted to announce a new studentship working on ‘Performing Bodies: Anatomical Display in the Twentieth-Century Fairground’

Applications are invited for one doctoral studentship commencing on 1 October 2015. This opportunity arises from University of Sheffield funding dedicated to developing its research resources, in this case the National Fairground Archive.

Application deadline: 12pm, Monday 11 May 2015
Interviews: interviews will take place in the week commencing 1 June 2015

Project description

The project will use the National Fairground Archive’s collection on sideshows and fairground exhibits in a multidisciplinary exploration of the popular presentation of bodily and anatomical display. Both simulacra (waxworks, mannequins and ‘sleeping beauty’ exhibits) and live display (freak shows to strip tease) were deployed within performative frameworks, exploiting ideas of the arcane, the unsettling and the macabre in relation to the body and embodiment. Within the noisy, transient and atemporal world of the fairground, these uncanny encounters provided important insight into popular constructions of human agency and identity.

Central areas of investigation include:

  • What do the historical, aesthetic and performative constructions of anatomical display reveal about contemporary understandings of embodiment and human identity and how did these change over the course of the twentieth century?
  • How are constructions of gendered bodies reflected and constructed within the fairground displays, discourses and practices?
  • How were scientific and medical discourses transposed into popular culture?
  • How might the fairground audience have made sense of these various forms of the human body, living and non-living, sexed and non-sexed?

Studentship description

Supervisory team: Professor Mary Vincent (Department of History), Dr Julia Dobson (School of Languages and Cultures)

The doctoral project will constitute an independent piece of research on a topic related to the overall project. The student will be able to use evidence and electronic resources generated by the project; attend project meetings, workshops and conferences; benefit from working closely with the investigators and Research Associates; and be given the opportunity to co-write publications. Nonetheless, in consultation with the supervisors, s/he will be given the latitude to shape their own direction of research.

The student will have access to the established archival practices and support of the National Fairground Archive and the multidisciplinary network of Medical Humanities Sheffield. Training available through the Doctoral Academy, Doctoral Development Programme provision and Faculty postgraduate networks is further supported by a dynamic postgraduate and research community.

Award Details

The award will cover the cost of UK/EU tuition fees and provides an annual maintenance grant at the standard RCUK rate (full-time rate £14,057 in 2015-16) for three years plus an annual Research Training Support Grant of £1,000 for expenses related to their research, such as travel, conferences, books, consumables and equipment. The studentship will commence on 1 October 2015.

Eligibility
To apply for the studentship, applicants need to apply directly to the University of Sheffield for entrance into the doctoral programme in History.

The general eligibility requirements are:

  • Applicants should normally have studied in a relevant field to a very good standard at MA level or equivalent experience.
  • Applicants should also have a 2.1 in a BA degree, or equivalent qualification, in a related discipline.
  • Awards are open to UK, EU and international applicants who are applying to study either full or part-time. Please note that only the UK/EU tuition fee rate is covered by the award.

 

How to apply

  • Complete an application for admission to the standard history PhD programme here.
  • Applications should include a research proposal; CV; academic writing sample; transcripts and two references.
  • The successful candidate will produce a thesis that responds to these issues in relation to the archive in a manner they devise. Your plan for this should be outlined in a research proposal of up to 1000 words, along with details of your interest, expertise and experience in a related field.
  • Supporting documents can either be uploaded to your application or sent by email or post to Miss Abby Brown, Department of History, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S3 7RA. abby.brown@sheffield.ac.uk.

 

Informal enquiries can be directed to Dr Julia Dobson (j.dobson@sheffield.ac.uk) and Professor Mary Vincent (m.t.vincent@sheffield.ac.uk).

Chatsworth Image 1 Large

Three New Collaborative Doctoral Awards supervised by Chatsworth House and the University of Sheffield

From Servants to Staff: the Whole Community in the Chatsworth Household 1700-2000

We are delighted to announce three AHRC-funded Collaborative Doctoral Awards co-supervised by Chatsworth House and the University of Sheffield

Application deadline: 12pm, Thursday 23 April 2015
Interviews: interviews will take place on 11 May 2015

Project Description

The aim of this project is to use the extensive archival materials in the Devonshire Collection in order to gain an understanding of the wider community who have lived and worked at Chatsworth over the past three centuries, brought together by relationships of work and service. It will employ an interdisciplinary linguistic-historical approach to explore the changing relationship between masters and servants between 1700 and 2000.

Key research questions to be addressed include:

  • how has the language used about servants and estate workers in these archives changed across this time?
  • how have the working conditions of those employed in and around the house changed?
  • how has Chatsworth functioned as a community at different times?
  • how can Chatsworth represent the stories of the people who have worked for the Cavendish family in an ethical and engaging manner?

The project comprises three interconnected PhD projects, each focusing on a different century. Each will be a coherent project in its own right, but taken together the three projects will chart a compelling narrative across three centuries of social and economic change.

 Studentship Descriptions

  • Community, Conflict and Change at Chatsworth, 1700-1820
  • A Community of Masters and Servants? Chatsworth, 1811-1914
  • The Making of a Modern Estate: Employment & Service at Chatsworth in the 20th Century

For more information on the studentships available, award details and eligibility please visit: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/history/phd/chatsworth

PhD-Masters-Scholarships

PhD Studentship Available – ‘Crime and Policing in 18th and 19th-Century London’

This studentship is attached to the AHRC funded Digital Transformations project, ‘The Digital Panopticon: The Global Impact of London Punishments, 1780-1925’, a collaborative project between the Universities of Liverpool, Sheffield, Oxford, Sussex, and Tasmania.

The project seeks to use innovative digital methodologies to investigate the penal outcomes of those convicted at the Old Bailey, by comparing imprisonment in Britain with transportation from Britain to Australia. The project will assemble large and complex bodies of criminal justice, genealogical and biometric data and use sophisticated visualisation and data-linking methodologies to map and analyse convict lives at both the collective and individual level.

The award will cover the cost of UK/EU tuition fees and provides an annual maintenance grant at the standard RCUK rate (full-time rate £13,863 for 2014-15) for three years. The studentship will commence on 1 October 2015.

To apply for the studentship, applicants need to apply directly to the University of Sheffield for entrance into the doctoral programme in History.

The general eligibility requirements are:

• Students applying for a doctoral studentship should normally have, or be studying for, a Master’s degree, or equivalent qualification, in History or a related discipline.
• Applicants should also have a 2.1 in a BA degree, or equivalent qualification, in history or a related discipline.
• Awards are open to UK, EU and international applicants who are applying to study either full or part-time.

For more information please see:
http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/history/phd/crime-and-policing

Any academic enquiries should be directed to Professor Robert Shoemaker (r.shoemaker@sheffield.ac.uk).

Any questions about the application process should be directed to Beky Hasnip (r.hasnip@sheffield.ac.uk).

Digital Panopticon

Extended deadline for our Digital Transformations PhD Project Studentships!

We are pleased to announce three new PhD studentships for 2014 entry attached to the AHRC funded Digital Transformations project, ‘The Digital Panopticon: The Global Impact of London Punishments, 1780-1925’ a collaborative project between the Universities of Liverpool, Sheffield, Oxford, Sussex, and Tasmania.

The project seeks to use innovative digital methodologies to investigate the penal outcomes of those convicted at the Old Bailey, by comparing imprisonment in Britain with transportation from Britain to Australia.

Deadline for applications: Monday 28 July 2014

Supervisor: Professor Bob Shoemaker

Find out more and apply here.

Studentship one: ‘The Social and Spatial Worlds of Old Bailey Convicts, 1785-1875’

This studentship will investigate the social and geographical origins and destinations of men and women convicted at the Old Bailey between 1785 and 1875, in order to shed light on patterns of mobility, the causes of crime, and understandings of identity in early industrial Britain.

Studentship two: ‘Criminal Recidivism in 18th and 19th-Century London’

The eighteenth and nineteenth centuries witnessed the development of the concepts of habitual offending and the criminal class. Taking advantage of the extensive records of both petty and serious crime digitised and linked together by the Digital Panopticon project, this studentship will investigate these phenomena from the perspective of the judicial records, by tracing the incidence and character of repeat offending.

Studentship three: ‘The Impact of Digital Resources in the History of Crime’

This project will examine the impact of the widespread availability of digital resources on attitudes towards crime and its history. Core case studies will include the Old Bailey Proceedings Online, Founders and Survivors (records of the 73,000 men women and children who were transported to Tasmania), and the Digital Panopticon website.

New British Library PhD Studentship on ‘The Printed Image 1750-1850’

We are pleased to announce another fully funded PhD studentship for 2014 entry!

This studentship on ‘The Printed Image 1750-1850: towards a Digital History of Printed Book Illustration’ is a collaborative award with the University of Sheffield and the British Library.

Visual culture was transformed by changes in printing technology in the 100 years after 1750. Supervised jointly by Dr Karen Harvey (Sheffield) and Dr James Baker (British Library) this digital humanities project rethinks why, how, and in what ways technology shaped the nature and meaning of book illustration between the mid-eighteenth and mid-nineteenth century.

Deadline: Friday 11 July 2014

Supervisors: Dr Karen Harvey (Sheffield) and Dr James Baker (British Library)

Find out more and apply here.