Tag Archives: The Digital Panopticon Project

EPSRC PhD Studentship Opportunity

We have a new EPSRC PhD studentship opportunity available:

‘Information Extraction and Entity Linkage in Historical Crime Records’

Applications are invited for the above EPSRC project studentship commencing on 1 October 2018. This project will develop and refine information extraction techniques by working with one of the most intractable, largely unstructured, sources in the humanities, historical newspapers. Addressing a challenge identified during the recently completed project, the Digital Panopticon: Tracing London Convicts in Britain & Australia, 1780-1925, this project will develop methods of extracting information about crimes and police court trials from English newspapers for linkage to the existing ‘life archives’ of convicts in the Digital Panopticon.

Application deadline: 5pm, Friday 18 May 2018
Interviews: interviews will take place week commencing 4 June 2018

For more information please see:
https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/history/…/information-extraction

Exhibition: Criminal Lives, 1780-1925: Punishing Old Bailey Convicts

The exhibition Criminal Lives, 1780-1925: Punishing Old Bailey Convicts is based on research by historians at the University of Sheffield and partner universities that has traced the lives of British convicts from the 18th and 19th centuries. Produced by the Arts and Humanities Research Council Digital Panopticon project in partnership with the London Metropolitan Archives (LMA), the exhibition combines original Victorian photographs, documents and prints from the city’s archives with convict life stories uncovered by the Digital Panopticon project. It also includes items such as a Victorian policeman’s truncheon, a reproduction Millbank Prison uniform and convicts’ photographs drawn from collections in Britain and Australia.

The exhibition sheds light on the lives of convicts from the Gordon Riots in 1780 to the early 20th century, including prostitute and pickpocket Charlotte Walker; Ikey Solomons, the notorious receiver of stolen goods; and serial thief Thomas Limpus, who was transported to Africa, America and Australia. Bob Shoemaker, Professor of History at the University of Sheffield, said: “This exhibition brings together a fascinating set of records from the LMA’s collections and other archives to show how the reformatory prison became the chief form of punishment in our judicial system. By using convict life stories to explain the origins of the modern prison, we hope that ‘Criminal Lives’ will help viewers see punishment in a new light.”

Criminal Lives, 1780-1925: Punishing Old Bailey Convicts opens in December 2017 at the London Metropolitan Archives (LMA) and will be on display until 16 May 2018. For visitor information, see here.

The Digital Panopticon project’s website, which enables users to trace the lives of British convicts imprisoned or transported to Australia, features on a new second year module for history students at the University of Sheffield.